Sophisticated Sunday: Sir Frank Dicksee

Dear Wonderful Reader,

It’s no wonder that Victorian painter, Sir Frank Dicksee centered his works around great literary works and epic scenes.  I am very fascinated by his ability to tell stories through his paintings.

  • Born: November 27, 1853, London, United Kingdom
  • Died: October 17, 1928

Fun Facts

  • Dicksee was knighted in 1925 (hence, the “Sir” that precedes his name).
  • His father Thomas Francis Dicksee (1819-1895), his sister Margaret Isabel (1858-1903) and brother Herbert Thomas (1862-1942) were also painters, as was his uncle John Robert Dicksee (1817-1905). So pretty much talent runs in the whole family!

Dicksee.Romeo Romeo and Julietchivalry-large Chivalry, 1885Sir_Frank_Dicksee_-_The_Two_Crowns_-_Google_Art_ProjectThe Two Crowns, 1900la_belle_dame_sans_merci-large Frank_Dicksee_n_Offering An Offering, 1898dicksee7 The End of the QuestDicksee-The_Mirror-1896 The Mirror, 1896dicksee2 Miranda, 1878startledStartled, 1892 (How pure and beautiful is this one!)12Portrait of Elsa, Daughter of William Hall, 1927the-funeral-of-a-viking-1893Funeral of a Viking, 1893aPortrait of Dora (Whoever that Dora was, she was certainly beautiful or just a killer profile or both!)

Hamlet Victorian Wisdom


The following passage appears in Hamlet Act 1, Scene 3. In the passage, Polonius is advising his son about life before he sets off to France. It’s one of my favorite passages because it so wise and I wish to live my life that way.

And these few precepts in thy memory
Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel,
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear ’t that th’ opposèd may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear but few thy voice.
Take each man’s censure but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not expressed in fancy—rich, not gaudy,
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be,
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell. My blessing season this in thee.

P.s. Maybe Polonius wasn’t a bad guy after all haha